laboratoryequipment:

Self-assembling Material May Produce Flat SemiconductorsResearchers around the world have been working to harness the unusual properties of graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms. But graphene lacks one important characteristic that would make it even more useful: a property called a bandgap, which is essential for making devices such as computer chips and solar cells.Now, researchers at MIT and Harvard Univ. have found a two-dimensional material whose properties are very similar to graphene, but with some distinct advantages — including the fact that this material naturally has a usable bandgap.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/self-assembling-material-may-produce-flat-semiconductors

laboratoryequipment:

Self-assembling Material May Produce Flat Semiconductors

Researchers around the world have been working to harness the unusual properties of graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms. But graphene lacks one important characteristic that would make it even more useful: a property called a bandgap, which is essential for making devices such as computer chips and solar cells.

Now, researchers at MIT and Harvard Univ. have found a two-dimensional material whose properties are very similar to graphene, but with some distinct advantages — including the fact that this material naturally has a usable bandgap.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/self-assembling-material-may-produce-flat-semiconductors

laboratoryequipment:

Self-assembling Material May Produce Flat SemiconductorsResearchers around the world have been working to harness the unusual properties of graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms. But graphene lacks one important characteristic that would make it even more useful: a property called a bandgap, which is essential for making devices such as computer chips and solar cells.Now, researchers at MIT and Harvard Univ. have found a two-dimensional material whose properties are very similar to graphene, but with some distinct advantages — including the fact that this material naturally has a usable bandgap.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/self-assembling-material-may-produce-flat-semiconductors

laboratoryequipment:

Self-assembling Material May Produce Flat Semiconductors

Researchers around the world have been working to harness the unusual properties of graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms. But graphene lacks one important characteristic that would make it even more useful: a property called a bandgap, which is essential for making devices such as computer chips and solar cells.

Now, researchers at MIT and Harvard Univ. have found a two-dimensional material whose properties are very similar to graphene, but with some distinct advantages — including the fact that this material naturally has a usable bandgap.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/self-assembling-material-may-produce-flat-semiconductors

rhamphotheca:

New Quasi-Particle Found:
Mysterious Quantum ‘Dropletons’ Form Inside Semiconductors Shot With Lasers
by Adam Mann
By shooting a semiconductor with ultra-fast laser pulses, scientists have discovered a new quasiparticle that behaves like a drop of liquid. They describe it as a quantum droplet, and named it “dropleton.”
These things were not predicted under any theory and surprised scientists when they appeared unexpectedly in extremely low temperature semiconductor experiments. They have properties unlike anything seen before.
“At first we scratched our heads,” said physicist Steven Cundiff of the University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, one of the authors of a paper appearing today in Nature. “But then we came up with this idea that what we were seeing was this new thing we’re calling a quantum droplet.”

Now before you start asking questions like, “What?” and “Huh?” we probably need to break things down a little here…
(read more: Wired Science)
image: Baxley/JILA

rhamphotheca:

New Quasi-Particle Found:

Mysterious Quantum ‘Dropletons’ Form Inside Semiconductors Shot With Lasers

by Adam Mann

By shooting a semiconductor with ultra-fast laser pulses, scientists have discovered a new quasiparticle that behaves like a drop of liquid. They describe it as a quantum droplet, and named it “dropleton.”

These things were not predicted under any theory and surprised scientists when they appeared unexpectedly in extremely low temperature semiconductor experiments. They have properties unlike anything seen before.

“At first we scratched our heads,” said physicist Steven Cundiff of the University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, one of the authors of a paper appearing today in Nature. “But then we came up with this idea that what we were seeing was this new thing we’re calling a quantum droplet.”

Now before you start asking questions like, “What?” and “Huh?” we probably need to break things down a little here…

(read more: Wired Science)

image: Baxley/JILA

Turning The Wires That Carry Power Into Batteries, Too

txchnologist:

by Marsha Lewis, Inside Science

Every day, millions of Americans rely on electronic devices that have one thing in common: they must be charged. The process is pretty simple, but it does require a bit of time and forethought.

But what if there were a better way to store and create the power needed to run these gadgets?

Now, scientists have created a better way using a simple electrical cable wire.

Read More

fastcompany:

A theory Malcolm Gladwell popularized in Outliers—that 10,000 hours of practice can turn anyone into an expert—probably isn’t true, a new study says.
Read More>

fastcompany:

A theory Malcolm Gladwell popularized in Outliers—that 10,000 hours of practice can turn anyone into an expert—probably isn’t true, a new study says.

Read More>