internetofth:

Super Senses: Benedetto Vigna

Physicist Benedetto Vigna explains how the mass production of tiny electronic sensors is allowing us to augment our senses like never before. We now have sensors in our phones, our game controllers, even our glasses-and these sensors are helping to bridge the gap between humans and the external world.

This Printable, Flexible Battery Could Revolutionize Wearable Tech

crunchwear:

New Post on http://www.crunchwear.com/printable-flexible-battery-revolutionize-wearable-tech/

This Printable, Flexible Battery Could Revolutionize Wearable Tech

image

Wearable technology, as it stands, is hampered by several technologies that haven’t quite caught up to their promise just yet. One of the most significant of these is power consumption. These devices use a lot of energy and, more than that, are hampered aesthetically by the breadth and…

Craig Weich VP Business Development Ardent Concepts

Craig Weich is VP Business Development at Ardent Concepts, a high growth technology company providing innovative, high-performance interfaces to the electronics industry: semiconductors, communications equipment, defense, computing, and medical devices. Customers include Apple, Intel, Qualcomm, and Broadcom. At Ardent, Craig leads Sales, Business Development, Marketing & Finance across all channels and markets.

Craig began his career in the General Electric Financial Management Program and in telecommunications Research and Development. This business and technology background is the foundation for his subsequent roles at venture-backed startups building new products and markets for innovative, emerging technologies across Telecom, Healthcare, Defense, Government, Industrial, and Energy industries.

laboratoryequipment:

Self-assembling Material May Produce Flat SemiconductorsResearchers around the world have been working to harness the unusual properties of graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms. But graphene lacks one important characteristic that would make it even more useful: a property called a bandgap, which is essential for making devices such as computer chips and solar cells.Now, researchers at MIT and Harvard Univ. have found a two-dimensional material whose properties are very similar to graphene, but with some distinct advantages — including the fact that this material naturally has a usable bandgap.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/self-assembling-material-may-produce-flat-semiconductors

laboratoryequipment:

Self-assembling Material May Produce Flat Semiconductors

Researchers around the world have been working to harness the unusual properties of graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms. But graphene lacks one important characteristic that would make it even more useful: a property called a bandgap, which is essential for making devices such as computer chips and solar cells.

Now, researchers at MIT and Harvard Univ. have found a two-dimensional material whose properties are very similar to graphene, but with some distinct advantages — including the fact that this material naturally has a usable bandgap.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/self-assembling-material-may-produce-flat-semiconductors

laboratoryequipment:

Self-assembling Material May Produce Flat SemiconductorsResearchers around the world have been working to harness the unusual properties of graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms. But graphene lacks one important characteristic that would make it even more useful: a property called a bandgap, which is essential for making devices such as computer chips and solar cells.Now, researchers at MIT and Harvard Univ. have found a two-dimensional material whose properties are very similar to graphene, but with some distinct advantages — including the fact that this material naturally has a usable bandgap.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/self-assembling-material-may-produce-flat-semiconductors

laboratoryequipment:

Self-assembling Material May Produce Flat Semiconductors

Researchers around the world have been working to harness the unusual properties of graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms. But graphene lacks one important characteristic that would make it even more useful: a property called a bandgap, which is essential for making devices such as computer chips and solar cells.

Now, researchers at MIT and Harvard Univ. have found a two-dimensional material whose properties are very similar to graphene, but with some distinct advantages — including the fact that this material naturally has a usable bandgap.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/self-assembling-material-may-produce-flat-semiconductors

rhamphotheca:

New Quasi-Particle Found:
Mysterious Quantum ‘Dropletons’ Form Inside Semiconductors Shot With Lasers
by Adam Mann
By shooting a semiconductor with ultra-fast laser pulses, scientists have discovered a new quasiparticle that behaves like a drop of liquid. They describe it as a quantum droplet, and named it “dropleton.”
These things were not predicted under any theory and surprised scientists when they appeared unexpectedly in extremely low temperature semiconductor experiments. They have properties unlike anything seen before.
“At first we scratched our heads,” said physicist Steven Cundiff of the University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, one of the authors of a paper appearing today in Nature. “But then we came up with this idea that what we were seeing was this new thing we’re calling a quantum droplet.”

Now before you start asking questions like, “What?” and “Huh?” we probably need to break things down a little here…
(read more: Wired Science)
image: Baxley/JILA

rhamphotheca:

New Quasi-Particle Found:

Mysterious Quantum ‘Dropletons’ Form Inside Semiconductors Shot With Lasers

by Adam Mann

By shooting a semiconductor with ultra-fast laser pulses, scientists have discovered a new quasiparticle that behaves like a drop of liquid. They describe it as a quantum droplet, and named it “dropleton.”

These things were not predicted under any theory and surprised scientists when they appeared unexpectedly in extremely low temperature semiconductor experiments. They have properties unlike anything seen before.

“At first we scratched our heads,” said physicist Steven Cundiff of the University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, one of the authors of a paper appearing today in Nature. “But then we came up with this idea that what we were seeing was this new thing we’re calling a quantum droplet.”

Now before you start asking questions like, “What?” and “Huh?” we probably need to break things down a little here…

(read more: Wired Science)

image: Baxley/JILA

Turning The Wires That Carry Power Into Batteries, Too

txchnologist:

by Marsha Lewis, Inside Science

Every day, millions of Americans rely on electronic devices that have one thing in common: they must be charged. The process is pretty simple, but it does require a bit of time and forethought.

But what if there were a better way to store and create the power needed to run these gadgets?

Now, scientists have created a better way using a simple electrical cable wire.

Read More